Caliente

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Lincoln County

Most of the Nevada mining camps that are written about on this website were small and short-lived. It can be tough to find much information on them. You can find books from a few authors like Hall, Paher and Patera. You can also find a few websites like NVExpeditions, Ray Dunakin, Forgotten Nevada and NVTami. But beyond that, it gets tough to find further information. That's why I am also writing about them on this website. With that said, towns like Austin, Battle Mountain, Beatty, Belmont, Caliente, Dayton, Elko, Eureka, Goldfield, Pioche, Manhattan, Tonopah and Virginia City (Comstock/ Gold Hill & Silver City) are NOT those camps. These places were massive mining towns with expansive and long-spanning mining histories. Each of these towns had populations in the thousands. A simple internet search will reveal a long list of websites that have written about these places. These towns are also still populated to this day. From a couple dozen in Belmont, to 2,500 in Tonopah, and 15,000 in Dayton. Therefore, I am not going to re-write the same history that can already be found in great detail on the internet. I am going to post extensive historical photographs for each of these towns though. Each one of these towns also has its own Nevada historical marker from the Nevada- State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). Each one of these towns will have their historical quote posted to its page.

Also see the following pages: Belmont Cemetery; Belmont- Combination Mill; Belmont- Monitor Belmont Mill; East Belmont; East Belmont- Cameron Mill; Longstreet's (North & South); McCann Station; Meadow Canyon; Stonehouse (Nye).

Nevada Historical Marker #55- Caliente- "Caliente- Culverwell's Ranch"
"Caliente was first settled as a ranch, furnishing hay for the mining camps of Pioche and Delamar. In 1901. the famous Harriman-Clark right-of-way battle was ended when rancher Charles Culverwell, with the aid of a broad-gauge shotgun, allowed one railroad grade to be built through his lush meadows. Harriman and Clark had been battling eleven years, building side-by-side grades, ignoring court orders and federal marshals. The population boom began with an influx of railroad workers, most of them immigrants from Austria, Japan and the Ottoman Empire. A tent city was settled in 1903. With the completion of the Los Angeles, San Pedro, and Salt Lake Railroad in 1905, Caliente became a division point. Beginning in 1906, the Caliente and Pioche Railroad (now the Union Pacific) was built between Pioche and the main line at Caliente. The large Mission Revival- style depot was built in 1923, serving as a civic center, as well as a hotel."