Jett

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Nye County

AKA: Garrard; Davenport; Silver Point; Birmingham; Argentore; Gilbraltar

Silver discoveries were first made in this area in 1875. This town would go through a series of name changes, but the area was first named Garrard. We've always just called it Jett Canyon. By 1876, activity in the area began to take off. In 1877, a camp was formed and it was named Davenport after one of the two original discoverers, Davenport and Jett. The camp was small with only a couple dozen miners living here. a community hall and a butcher shop were built. In late 1878, john Jett died near Moore's Station and the town voted to change the name to Jett. In 1880, the post office opened. It was located inside of the town's first store. A saloon was also opened. Like so many other Nevada camps, a decline began in 1881 and the post office shut down. The only mine running after this was the Silver Point, so name changed again to Silver Point. A brief revival occurred with the Senator Mine and the post office reopened in 1890. but again, the camp was done by 1891. A 1912 revival saw the name change again to Birmingham, but this was done almost as soon as it started. A 1919 revival saw the name change to Argentore or Gilbraltar. This camp was formed at the mouth of the canyon, rather than a couple miles up the canyon like before. From a modern- day perspective, this makes sense. When you look at the photos below, they may be deceiving. In many ghost towns and old mining camps, you often find relics located in close proximity. In Jett Canyon, you will find these relics scattered in different locations over distance. Back to the 1919 revival called Argentore/ Gibraltar. One of those responsible for discovering this new vein was Harry Stimler. He was one of the original founders of Goldfield. A boardinghouse was built, but the camp didn't last. By 1921, it was over. Stimler kept the claims alive and sold in 1922. By 1925, it was over for good. A few men worked tungsten in the area in the 1950's, but nothing major.

In 1915, a very expensive pipeline from Jett Canyon was built. This was to support successful placer operations that were taking place near Round Mountain on the other side of the Smoky Valley. It appears that this was very successful and occurred for well over a decade. In 1922, a new camp called Silverton was formed near Lockes. The equipment from Jett was bought and hauled there.

Post Office: March 16, 1880 to April 21, 1881; June 6, 1890 to March 25, 1891 (at Jett).

The first photograph shows a view looking down and out of the mouth of the canyon. You can see Round Mountain Gold in the distance. Round Mountain Gold was a view that I saw a dozen times a month for six years.

Last Trip/ Road Conditions: June 2017. I have included a photograph of the road going into Jett. The creek is the road. If it's flowing like it was in 2017, you will be driving through it for a while. It is also very overgrown. We were on quads, so it was a little easier to navigate. Like I stated above, the relics here are scattered from low to high. You will have to stop and look around. We took several spur roads in the area where we found bits and pieces. This is one of those all- day trips. If you're looking for an easy drive where you pull up, see what you came to see for half an hour and then leave, this isn't the trip for you.